Tea Plantations in Sri Lanka

The cool highlands of Sri Lanka are famous for tea plantations, and on a recent visit to the country I had the opportunity to photograph tea workers and scenery in several tea estates in the Pelmadulla region. Almost without exception, the friendly locals were happy to be photographed and made great subjects.

Tea plantation in the hills of Sri Lanka (Marc Anderson)

Tea plantation in the hills of Sri Lanka (Marc Anderson)

Smiling woman picking tea in a tea plantation, Sri Lanka (Marc Anderson)

Smiling woman picking tea in a tea plantation, Sri Lanka (Marc Anderson)

Smiling woman picking tea in a tea plantation, Sri Lanka (Marc Anderson)

Smiling woman picking tea in a tea plantation, Sri Lanka (Marc Anderson)

 
You can see a selection of photos from Sri Lanka’s tea plantations, wildlife and scenery in the ‘Sri Lanka’ gallery of my stock photo archive. To view all stock photos from Sri Lanka use the ‘Search‘ page to search via keywords.
 

Bushfire Patterns

Last week I passed through a section of Wollemi National Park which had been affected by recent bushfires. I found the bark on some of the fallen trees fascinating – colours still burning & the soft light & shadows brought out the intricate details on the crumbling bark.
 
Detail and patterns in burnt bark on an Angophora tree (Angophora costata) scorched by recent bushfires, Wollemi National Park, NSW, Australia (Marc Anderson)
 
Detail and patterns in burnt bark on an Angophora tree (Angophora costata) scorched by recent bushfires, Wollemi National Park, NSW, Australia (Marc Anderson)
 
Detail and patterns in burnt bark on an Angophora tree (Angophora costata) scorched by recent bushfires, Wollemi National Park, NSW, Australia (Marc Anderson)
 
Detail and patterns in burnt bark on an Angophora tree (Angophora costata) scorched by recent bushfires, Wollemi National Park, NSW, Australia (Marc Anderson)
 
Detail and patterns in burnt bark on an Angophora tree (Angophora costata) scorched by recent bushfires, Wollemi National Park, NSW, Australia (Marc Anderson)
 

Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Telephoto Zoom Lens – Additional Comments and Images

Following my ‘first impressions’ post from about a week ago, I’ve since tested the Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 in a variety of field conditions shooting a number of different species of wildlife. As mentioned in the previous article, this is a very competent lens for bird & wildlife photographers.

Tamron 150-600mm – Best on Full Frame Sensors?

The Tamron 150-600mm is particularly well suited to full frame DSLRs with minimal high ISO noise such as the Canon 5DIII, Canon 6D & Nikon D800. Being able to use high ISO settings up to ISO 12800 enables you to maintain a shutter speed of 1/160 or faster in many situations. Sure, you’ll find reviews of this lens where the photographer was able to get a sharp image at 1/60 or even lower, but in the field I have found 1/160 to be my minimum shutter speed which results in a higher percentage of consistently sharp ‘keepers’.

I’d be interested to see how this lens performs for wildlife photographers in the field using a crop sensor such as on the Canon 70D or 7D. My guess is that it would be wonderful to shoot at a whopping 960mm (on Canon 1.6 x 600mm) in good lighting conditions, but the high ISO performance of the crop sensors would become the weakest link in less-than-ideal light. Please let me know if you find any reviews or tests relating to this.

600mm & “The Comfort Zone”

After shooting in several locations and dozens of species of bird, mammal & reptile throughout the week, one particular benefit of shooting wildlife with a 600mm lens which I would like to mention is the ‘comfort zone’ it allows. Using a lens of this focal length means you don’t have to approach too closely when compared with shorter lenses. Previously I have used a Canon 300mm f4 with a 1.4x converter (420mm on a full frame DSLR) and although it was a great combo in terms of image quality, I needed to position myself just that little bit closer to photograph birds and I spent more time trying to get in a good position rather than actually taking photos. With the 600mm lens, it seems to allow just enough distance so you don’t have to press into the ‘comfort zone’ of your subject in many situations. I’ve enjoyed standing that little bit further back and photographing birds feeding, preening and looking generally more relaxed than they would if I was pushing in closer with a shorter lens. Those using a crop sensor would benefit from this advantage even further.

Full size jpg’s can be viewed by clicking on each of the main photos below –

Eastern Grey Kangaroo, Cattai National Park, NSW, Australia

Eastern Grey Kangaroo, Cattai National Park, NSW, Australia
Canon 5D Mark III / Tamron 150-600mm VC @ 500mm / f7.1 / 1/250s / ISO 640 / handheld from car

Eastern Grey Kangaroo

100% crop

Pacific Black Duck

Pacific Black Duck
Canon 5D Mark III / Tamron SP 150-600mm f5-6.3 Di VC USD @ 600mm / f6.3 / 1/320s / ISO 1600 / handheld

Pacific Black Duck

100% crop – wide open at f6.3 is a bit softer than stopping down to f7.1

Purple Swamphen

Purple Swamphen
Canon 5D Mark III / Tamron SP 150-600mm f5-6.3 Di VC USD @ 600mm / f7.1 / 1/160s / ISO 2000 / handheld

Purple Swamphen

100% crop – not pin sharp but I may have been a touch off focus here

See also New Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Lens – First Impressions In the Field

In addition to my photography work, I also capture high quality audio recordings of nature sounds. More information and downloadable recordings are available from the Wild Ambience website .

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